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"Bridging religious and cultural divides"

Community life within the Seminary reflects the varied backgrounds of students, staff and faculty, all sharing a common commitment to and a quest for true love and authentic discipleship.

Developing a rich personal relationship with God through prayer and worship is the most important dimension of life at UTS. At both locations, students organize daily worship. A vibrant Sunday worship service welcomes students, staff and guests from the community. The chapel services bring noted speakers and serve as a venue for student groups to lead worship.

Students may also attend services at other local houses of worship to broaden their understanding of worship traditions and to add to their spirituality.

Personal spiritual formation at UTS is fostered through participation in chapel. Students are encouraged to attend when they are on campus. Spiritual formation is also enriched by service. Extra curricular responsibilities on campus and service projects in the local area offer many opportunities to serve.

The student body is comprised of people from diverse nations and religious backgrounds with a rich variety of perspectives and life experiences. Sharing out of their diverse cultures, student fellowship offers opportunities to broaden cultural horizons and develop facility in intercultural communication.

Seminars and conferences organized by students and faculty on both campuses focus on issues and topics of great value for Seminary students. These programs bring students and faculty together in dialogue to enrich each student’s spiritual and ministerial life.

Student Code of Conduct

All students are expected to conduct themselves with dignity, courtesy, responsibility and integrity and with due respect for the rights of others. Purity, sobriety and morality are not only characteristics of a mature and responsible person, but are essential to the maintenance of a free and orderly community. Students are required to sign the Student Code as a pledge of their willingness to uphold the ethical and moral standards of UTS.

Unification Theological Seminary Student Code

I commit myself before God:

1.    To develop my relationship with God through regular spiritual practices with full devotion of heart, mind and body;

2.    To uphold and live according to the highest moral and ethical standards in my personal life and relations with others;

3.    To respect the campus as a smoke-free, alcohol-free and drug-free environment, and to maintain my body at all times as a temple of God;

4.    To refrain from premarital and extra-marital relationships, sexual harassment and pornography;

5.    To respect the diversity of cultural and religious traditions;

6.    To attend enrolled classes and fulfill academic responsibilities with honesty and integrity;

7.    To pursue my religious vocation with integrity upon graduation.

I recognize that admission to UTS is a privilege, and hereby make my sincere commitment in heart and action to the provisions of this code, and to all standards of the Seminary as described in the Student Handbook.

The Unification Theological Seminary reserves the right to place on probation, suspend or dismiss at its discretion, any student who fails to maintain a satisfactory academic record, acceptable personal behavior, sufficient standard of health, or who fails to comply with the Student Code. However, every student is guaranteed due process as outlined in the Student Handbook.

Student Life

Admission to UTS guarantees the student the right to pursue the course of study to which he or she is admitted. Each student will be treated with the dignity appropriate to an adult person in all matters relating to the Seminary. In the same spirit, the student shall comply with all the policies, rules and regulations of the seminary.

New Student Orientation

An orientation program is held for new students at the beginning of each term. The program acquaints students with the mission and purpose of UTS, its organizational structure, curriculum, library and other facilities, daily routine, student services and activities, and student rights and responsibilities.

Interfaith Community Life

UTS is building a multi-faith teaching and learning community of faculty, staff and students united in a vision for world peace through ideal families, or “one family under God.” It is open to the schools, religious bodies and individuals of faiths other than Unificationism, in particular in the local area. Effort is made to provide spiritual resources for students of different faiths, facilitating their connection to local houses of worship.

Student Government

A Student Advocacy Council, consisting of student officers, student representatives, and the Vice-President for Academic Affairs supervises student life at the Seminary in order to maintain a cohesive and healthy community. The Student Advocacy Council meets regularly to discuss and deal with issues of concern. The Student Advocacy Council President chairs the meetings. Elections are held each year to elect the officers of the Council.

The student officers and representatives function as the major link between the administration and the student body, coordinating activities and assisting in advising and organizing tasks to be accomplished. The Student Advocacy Council President participates in the VP Academic Council meetings.

Students also participate in student committees and serve as representatives on certain faculty and administrative committees. Ad hoc student groups form to meet specific needs.

Student Activities and Clubs

Seminary students are encouraged to organize student clubs and activities through which each student can grow in leadership ability and explore non academic areas while developing his/her personal potential. Guest lecturers representing varied interests supplement the scheduled courses. Occasionally the Seminary sponsors cultural affairs programs that bring noted ministers, musicians and writers to the campus. Field trips to museums, churches and religious communities are integral to some courses. Students may participate in Seminary  sponsored conferences and conferences offered by other schools.

The Barrytown campus’s athletic facilities include a gymnasium, soccer and baseball fields, tennis courts, and a dojang for martial arts training. The wooded grounds extending to the banks of the Hudson River include nature trails, a pond, a labyrinth, gardens and picnic area, and offer ample opportunities for walks, picnics, fishing, bird-watching, ice-skating and cross country skiing.

Over the years, students have lent their efforts to improving the campus environment. Their efforts at landscaping and maintaining the nature trails have aesthetically enhanced the campus property. The gazebo area is now a popular place for student groups to enjoy cook outs and fellowship.


UTS maintains campus security on the main campus through a schedule of closing hours and a night patrol. The campus buildings meet local fire-safety codes, and there are regular fire inspections and fire drills. No crimes or instances of sexual harassment were reported on either the Barrytown campus or the Extension Center campus in the 2013-14 academic year.

Campus Safety is a 24-hour service on the Barrytown campus. When an emergency safety, security (or after-hours maintenance) problem occurs, students can call Campus Safety at (845) 663-3601. If a stranger is around the building without cause, or if they feel unsafe for any reason, Campus Safety is available.

Student Services

Vocational Advisement

Vocational advisement at UTS is an ongoing process. The UTS experience deepens the student’s commitment to serve and expands the student’s skills.

The Mid-Program Review, conducted midway through the program, provides a second occasion for students to articulate their learning goals and their vision for ministry. Students prepare a portfolio through which to assess their progress and better define their interests.

Advisement at UTS is predicated on the understanding that each student is ultimately responsible to find his or her own placement or, in the case of those who have made a prior commitment, to fulfilling that commitment with integrity.


The Seminary seeks to assist students working through problems of a personal and interpersonal nature. Student body officers, members of the faculty and administrative staff may act as counselors. Students may also schedule an appointment with the Seminary’s chaplain. Another resource for students is their church pastor. Students may also be given referrals can be made to counselors outside of the Seminary community.

Medical Care

Students are solely responsible for their medical and dental expenses while at UTS. In case of a medical emergency, students at the Barrytown campus can expect to go for treatment to the emergency room at Northern Dutchess Hospital or other area hospitals. Students in New York City can expect to go to the emergency room near where they live. Students with long-term medical issues are encouraged to obtain the services of a local physician.

Medical care in the United States can be expensive. Therefore, students, in particular married students with families, are strongly encouraged to enroll in a health insurance plan upon registration and to maintain their health insurance while students at UTS.


A laundry room located in the southwest wing of the main building of the Barrytown campus has washers, dryers, and ironing facilities.

Library Services

Seminary students have access to both the Barrytown campus library and the Extension center library and its trained staff. In addition, students have limited access to other local libraries throughout Metropolitan New York.

The New York Extension Center library also provides students access to computers, photocopying and scanning facilities.  Beginning with the 2014-2015 academic year, students may also check out Chromebooks for use while on campus to support their research needs.

Between classes students may relax, fellowhip or study in the student lounge.

Students at the Maryland extension site have access to the digital resources through the library’s webpage.

"Bridging religious and cultural divides"

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