The Family Research Council’s 10th annual three day leadership conference billed as the “Values Voter Summit” (VVS) Sept. 25-27 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C., drew UTS alumni determined to make a difference in restoring culture in America, relating principled values to culture.

Contributed by Serge Brosseau MRE (UTS ’98)
I am a graduate of the UTS class of ’98; my wife, Melissa, and I were blessed in marriage in Korea with 6000 couples in 1982; and our daughter, Rebecca, is turning 24 in a few weeks. I have been the pastor of the Montreal community for the past sixteen years.

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no_religious_affiliationThe number of Americans who do not identify with any religion continues to grow at a rapid pace. One-fifth of the U.S. public - and a third of adults under 30 - are religiously unaffiliated today, the highest percentages ever in Pew Research Center polling.

In the last five years alone, the unaffiliated have increased from just over 15% to just under 20% of all U.S. adults. Their ranks now include more than 13 million self-described atheists and agnostics (nearly 6% of the U.S. public), as well as nearly 33 million people who say they have no particular religious affiliation (14%).

This large and growing group of Americans is less religious than the public at large on many conventional measures, including frequency of attendance at religious services and the degree of importance they attach to religion in their lives.

However, a new survey by the Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life, conducted jointly with the PBS television program Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly, finds that many of the country's 46 million unaffiliated adults are religious or spiritual in some way. Two-thirds of them say they believe in God (68%). More than half say they often feel a deep connection with nature and the earth (58%), while more than a third classify themselves as "spiritual" but not "religious" (37%), and one-in-five (21%) say they pray every day. In addition, most religiously unaffiliated Americans think that churches and other religious institutions benefit society by strengthening community bonds and aiding the poor.

With few exceptions, though, the unaffiliated say they are not looking for a religion that would be right for them. Overwhelmingly, they think that religious organizations are too concerned with money and power, too focused on rules and too involved in politics.

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